The Gross Anatomy of Climate Denial

In a recent blogpost on Conservationbytes, CJA Bradshaw laments the fact that despite widespread and higher quality science communication, there is still so much “nonsensical political extremism, religiosity, declining educational standards, scientific denialism, conspiracy theories and evidence-free dogmas.” Bradshaw’s own theory is that that “we have finally entered a phase of compensatory resource competition (human…

Connecting Habitats, Connecting Disciplines

James Lee and Simon Nicholas are undertaking research projects as part of the Environmental Management Research Internship. Although at first glance the two projects would appear to be very different in subject matter and approach, a closer look reveals a common theme of ‘connectivity’. Simon’s project is concerned with the isolation of the Blue Mountains…

Fracking and freshwater:

Who is responsible for fracking wastewater and how does that affect Michigan’s economy, communities and ecosystems? This is a map of the State of Michigan. The iconic Michigan glove is surrounded by freshwater lakes – the Great Lakes, which form part of the state’s natural and cultural identity. On this map, the red dots represent…

Stakeholder analysis and intercultural dialogue: an insight from Colombia

It is commonly agreed that stakeholder participation in environmental decisions offers many benefits, but there is some level of concern that this tool may not be living up to some of its expectations. In particular, there is some level of concern that the interaction with ethnic minorities – especially when there are sizeable differences in…

Rewilding Scotland – can we live with the big, bad wolf?

By Tim Smith April 3rd, 2014 Rewilding is a topical issue in the UK at the moment, largely led by the journalist George Monbiot, who has recently written a book on the subject, entitled ‘Feral.’ In Monbiot’s brave new world, the UK’s green and pleasant landscape comes alive with wolves, lynx and even bears. For…